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Health Care Debate Goes To Supreme Court

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This Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012 file photo shows the U.S. Supreme Court Building Washington.
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite
This Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012 file photo shows the U.S. Supreme Court Building Washington.

The health care debate sucked the air out of Capitol Hill for well over a year when the bill was being crafted, and then when Republicans took control of the House on a message of repealing the legislation. The health care issue will again be a main topic for lawmakers this week, as the Supreme Court prepares to rule on the Affordable Care Act. 

Rep Jim Moran (D-Va.) helped pass the bill, but he's not feeling optimistic about its future.

"I have no way of anticipating what the court is going to do, although given the ideological makeup, I have to assume they are going to try to undermine the intent of the health care law," says Moran.

Rep. Morgan Griffith (R-Va.) says however the court rules it will put the issue back in the forefront on Capitol Hill.

"I think if the court strikes down the whole bill, or if it strikes down the individual mandate, either one, you'll see a lot of jockeying going on to try to figure out where we go from here," says Griffith. "But it's really all on hold until we find out what the Supreme Court says."

Rep. Scott Rigell (R-Va.) says if the bill gets struck down it will be time for both parties to come together and find a solution.

"And then we can move forward collectively, together," says Rigell. "Those are areas where we do have agreement. This must be done, and I believe it can be done."

The high court is expected to rule on the legislation when it meets on Thursday.

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