NPR : News

Ugly Mugly Wins Ugliest Dog Contest

Living up to his name, Mugly has won the title of World's Ugliest Dog.

Like many of the previous title holders, Mugly is a Chinese crested. It's a breed known for being mostly hairless and prone to a few conditions that can make the tiny dogs heavyweights in an ugly contest.

Eight-year-old Mugly, however, is already a champ. Owner Bev Nicholson from Peterborough, England, claims he was named Britain's ugliest dog in 2005, as the AP says.

"I think that he is the most beautiful dog from the inside out and want the world to know that too," she told her local newspaper, the Peterborough Telegraph. "He will be flying the flag for all British doggies that are challenged in the beauty department."

A few oddly placed whiskers and teeth seemed to be his secret for winning the annual competition in Northern California on Friday. Looking at his 29 competitors from around the world, it must have been a tough choice.

Contest host and pet psychic Sonya Fitz apparently conducted an interview round with the contestants. On the contest site she reports the dogs "loved the attention they were receiving and didn't mind the 'ugly' label one bit."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Do You Want To Build A Lawsuit? China Totally Copied 'Frozen,' Kid Says

A new anthem produced for the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics is being attacked online as too similar to "Let It Go" from the film "Frozen." We asked a 5-year-old girl to assess the merits of the case.
WAMU 88.5

The Surprising Roots of Barbecue

We speak with culinary historian Michael Twitty about the roots of familiar southern dishes in African and Native American food traditions.

WAMU 88.5

President Obama's Iran Speech

Veteran journalist Marvin Kalb joins us to discuss the parallels between JFK's nuclear disarmament speech fifty years ago and President Obama's speech on the nuclear deal with Iran.

NPR

Sexist Reactions To An Ad Spark #ILookLikeAnEngineer Campaign

After being surprised by online responses to her appearance in a recruiting ad, engineer Isis Wenger wanted to see if anyone else felt like they didn't fit a "cookie-cutter mold."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.