WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Special Olympics Supporters Go 'Over The Edge'

Play associated audio
At the Over The Edge event, supporters of the Special Olympics scale the side of a building.
Markette Smith
At the Over The Edge event, supporters of the Special Olympics scale the side of a building.

Some real life super heroes are going to extremes and taking a leap off the top of the Hilton in Crystal City to help athletes with special needs.

More than 60 people, in fact, are testing their super hero skills as they strap on harnesses and attempt to rappel down the side of the 15-story building.

The stunt is a fundraiser for Special Olympics Virginia and the organization has set up the exercise to challenge supporters to move out of their comfort zone and go over the edge, literally, to raise awareness.

Fairfax County Police Chief Dave Rohrer is one of the dare-devils. He takes the leap every year to raise funds for Special Olympics

"When you think about the challenges that the athletes face, or anyone with intellectual disabilities, you know? For us to do this is nothing compared to what they face every day," says Rohrer.

One of the bystanders cheering him on is Connie Hill, who just happened to be walking by. "Well, I have a personal connection to the Special Olympics, because I have a brother who has downs syndrome. He's actually about 50 years old now, and he's always been very athletic."

All the participants raised a minimum of a $1000 each before taking the leap.


From Trembling Teacher To Seasoned Mentor: How Tim Gunn Made It Work

Gunn, the mentor to young designers on Project Runway, has been a teacher and educator for decades. But he spent his childhood "absolutely hating, hating, hating, hating school," he says.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.