Occupy DC Protesters Found Guilty Of Refusing Police Order | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Occupy DC Protesters Found Guilty Of Refusing Police Order

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A judge convicted 11 Occupy DC protesters for failing to get down from an improvised wooden structure in McPherson Square.
Patrick Madden
A judge convicted 11 Occupy DC protesters for failing to get down from an improvised wooden structure in McPherson Square.

Several Occupy DC protesters have been found guilty of refusing police orders to get down from a structure they erected in McPherson Square. Superior Court Magistrate Judge Elizabeth Wingo found the 11 guilty on Thursday during a non-jury trial.

Authorities say the protesters refused to dismount from a wooden structure they built last December at their encampment site.

The attorney general's office says 11 protesters were found guilty of failure to obey an order, and one was also found guilty of indecent exposure and disorderly conduct. A twelfth person was acquitted.

The protester found guilty of indecent exposure was given a 180-day suspended jail sentence. The remaining protesters were either fined or ordered to make payments to a compensation fund for crime victims.

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