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Maryland Casino Plan Scrapped, But Only For This Year

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A special session on gaming was scrapped for this year, but casino backers will approach the idea again next year.
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A special session on gaming was scrapped for this year, but casino backers will approach the idea again next year.

The plan for a casino at the National Harbor in Prince George's County, Md. might be dead for this year, but it's not done for good.

The work group looking at gaming expansion in the state told governor Martin O'Malley yesterday it could not reach consensus on the matter, meaning there will be no special session of the General Assembly on the topic next month.

But MGM, which announced last week it had reached an agreement to operate a potential casino at National Harbor, says it's still committed to the project. The earliest the topic of a new casino license for a facility in Prince George's County can be decided is during the regular session of the General Assembly next year.

There must be a voter referendum as well if lawmakers and the governor give their okay, and the earliest that can now take place is 2014.

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