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D.C. Heat Approaches Record Thursday

Crowds of people cool off at the fountain in the Sculpture Garden at the National Gallery of Art.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/poritsky/3900734292/
Crowds of people cool off at the fountain in the Sculpture Garden at the National Gallery of Art.

The mid-Atlantic region is swooning amidst sweltering day, and officials are warning residents to limit their time outdoors and stay hydrated.

The National Weather Service has issued a heat advisory until 10 p.m. Thursday. It says the temperatures will be in the upper 90s, with NBC posting a high of 99 degrees and a heat index between 100 and 105. However, a few showers and thunderstorms are possible in the Washington area in the evening.

A code orange air quality alert has also been issued. Children and adults with respiratory and heart ailments may experience health effects and should limit their time outside.

The record high temperature for the day in Washington is 98 degrees, set in 1988. The record in Baltimore is 100, set in 1923. At just before 8 a.m., both areas had reached 83.

Temperatures are expected to begin dropping on Friday.

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