Judge Upholds Negligence Verdict Against Virginia Tech | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Judge Upholds Negligence Verdict Against Virginia Tech

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Greg Peppers

 A judge in Virginia has upheld a jury's negligence verdict against the state from the 2007 mass killings at Virginia Tech, but in so doing, the judge sharply reduced damages awarded to two families.

Franklin County Circuit Judge William Alexander II reduced the jury damages awarded to each family to $100,000, the statutory cap on damages against the state. Jurors had awarded each family $4 million.

The wrongful death lawsuit was filed by the families of two students who were among the 33 left dead on the Blacksburg campus after a rampage by a lone gunman. The families were the only ones eligible who did not accept their share of a $11 million state settlement. Attorneys successfully argued the university waited too long before alerting the campus of the first two shootings.

The April 16, 2007,  attack on the Blacksburg campus was the deadliest in modern U.S. history.

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