D.C. Sees Decrease In New HIV Cases | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

D.C. Sees Decrease In New HIV Cases

Play associated audio
The number of new cases of HIV in the District continues to decline, though many cases still go unreported.
Ashley Dejean
The number of new cases of HIV in the District continues to decline, though many cases still go unreported.

The latest information from D.C.'s Department of Health shows a slight decrease in the number of new HIV cases from 2009 to 2010, although the rate increased among one group sampled: poor, heterosexual women. 

The HIV/AIDS rate increased from 6 to 12 percent among lower-income heterosexual women; an increase health officials attribute to their efforts to get more people tested for the disease so they know their HIV status. 

But the 835 new cases of HIV contracted last year are "still 835 too many," says D.C. Department of Health Chief Dr. Mohammad Akhter. "Every day, two or three people get infected in the city."

Akhter says by the end of this year the District will have a "Medical Homes Program" in place.

"It means just like the home," he says. "If you don't show up, someone calls, 'honey where are you?' If you don't show up for your appointment, someone calls, because somebody cares. In addition to that, care is coordinated."

One barrier to patients continuing treatment is when residents have to go to different doctors and venues for complicated health needs, says Akhter. The Medical Homes Program is meant to keep tabs on that, and won't cost any additional money.

Currently, 2.7 percent of District residents are living with HIV. That's approximately 14,500 people. D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray attributes the decrease in new HIV cases to a needle exchange program and condom distribution. Last year 5 million condoms were distributed in the District of Columbia.

Gray says that's a tenfold increase from 2007. Since then the Department of Health has also tripled the number of HIV tests. Estimates say that between 20 to 40 percent of HIV infected people in the District are unaware of their diagnosis.

NPR

For Paul Cezanne, An Apple A Day Kept Obscurity Away

In the 1800s, still-life painting was the bottom feeder of the art world, but that's where the French painter chose to leave his mark. "I want to astonish Paris with an apple," he's said to have said.
NPR

From McDonald's To Organic Valley, You're Probably Eating Wood Pulp

Many processed foods contain cellulose, which is plant fiber that is commonly extracted from wood. It's used to add texture, prevent caking and boost fiber. And it's been around for ages.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Democrats And Republicans Fight Over Investigating Senator's Resignation

Democrats and Republicans in Virginia are at odds over the value of investigating the state Senator Phil Puckett, who resigned last month to take a job at a state tobacco commission — and turned the Senate over to Republicans.
NPR

Hackers In China Reportedly Targeted U.S. Federal Workers

According to a report in The New York Times, hackers accessed U.S. government databases in March and apparently targeted files on employees who have applied for top-secret security clearances.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.