WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Loudoun County Board Meeting Monday On Silver Line Funding

Play associated audio
A pig protesting Loudoun County's participation in the Dulles Rail project outside the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors meeting June 4.
Martin Di Caro
A pig protesting Loudoun County's participation in the Dulles Rail project outside the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors meeting June 4.

The fate of Phase 2 of the Silver Line rail project to Dulles Airport may start taking shape tonight at an important meeting in Loudoun County.

The Loudoun County Board of Supervisors will hold their final work session Monday to weigh proposals to raise the $270 million that represents their commitment to the second half of the Silver Line project. One proposal, for instance, would create special tax districts near future Metro stops.

No matter the final decision, the board will not have enough time to actually implement a plan before the July 4 deadline for the county to either stay in the project or opt out. This is raising concerns among some taxpayers that they may eventually get stuck holding the bag.

At the very least, the board, which remains split over whether to opt-in to rail-to-Dulles altogether, might be able to offer the public a framework of how the county is going to finance Phase 2 for years to come.

NPR

Encore: 'Future Shock' 40 Years Later

Future Shock by Alvin Toffler was a huge sensation when it was published in 1970. The book perfectly captured the angst of that time and prepared society for more changes to come.
NPR

In Prison, The Passion That Drove A Yogurt-Maker To Arson Still Burns

The yogurt entrepreneur who set fire to his factory remains in prison, but he's in better spirits now. "He's dreaming again," says his wife.
NPR

Prohibition-Era Gang Violence Prompted Congress To Act On Gun Control

In the 1930s, the United States government was absorbed with a different kind of gun violence: prohibition-era gangsters using fully automatic weapons of war, with civilians often caught in the crossfire. NPR looks back at how the U.S. Congress, at the urging of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, passed the nation's first firearms legislation, which still holds today.
NPR

'Future Shock' Author Alvin Toffler Dies at 87

Toffler's warnings about 'information overload' and the accelerating pace of change in modern society made his seminal 1970 book a best-seller in the U.S. and around the world.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.