Virginia Seeks Funding For Monument Honoring Women | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Virginia Seeks Funding For Monument Honoring Women

Play associated audio

The monument will be located near the Edgar Allen Poe statue on the west side of Capitol Square. Secretary of Administration Lisa Hick Thomas, who heads the Women's Monument Commission, says because the statue will encompass so many ideas, finding the right artist and funding the multi-million dollar project is a worthwhile, yet huge, undertaking.

"We want there to be an educational component," she says. "There should be some synergy between the monument and the Library of Virginia. Folks will be able to not only come and look at the monument, but maybe some of the exhibits. We want it to invoke a love for history, and for folks to be able to learn more about the contribution of women."

Thomas says the goal is to send out a proposal request by next month, artist submissions by October, and an announcement of the winner and what the tribute will look like by March.

The monument must be paid for with private funds, and Thomas says the panel will gladly take donations from interested parties.

NPR

Two Prominent Museum Directors Encourage 'New Ways Of Thinking'

Host Michel Martin speaks with the directors of the National Museum of African Art and the National Museum of the American Indian. Both institutions are celebrating important anniversaries this year.
NPR

The Epic 2,200-Mile Tour De France Is Also A Test Of Epic Eating

Tour de France cyclists need to eat up to 9,000 calories a day to maintain their health and weight during the race. But many teams hire chefs to elevate the meals to gourmet status.
NPR

California Nurses Union Braces For Contract Battle

The largest union of nurses in California starts contract negotiations Thursday with Kaiser Permanente's hospitals. Talks went smoothly four years ago, but this round will likely be more contentious.
NPR

A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We're Gone

In the digital age, our online accounts don't die with us. A proposed law might determine what does happen to them. But the tech industry warns the measure could threaten the privacy of the deceased.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.