NPR : News

Filed Under:

Fete Fit For A Queen: Diamond Jubilee Draws To A Close

Four days of celebrating Queen Elizabeth II's 60th year on the throne are coming to an end as the U.K. wraps up the Diamond Jubilee festivities in London.

There's a huge crowd outside Buckingham Palace this hour. People lined up for hours for a chance to see the queen as she rode by in a carriage following this morning's service at St. Paul's Cathedral, and to see her appear on the palace's balcony. She came out on the balcony just before 10:30 a.m. ET, with most of her family (Prince Philip was taken ill Monday, as we reported).

There was also one of those impressive flybys of Royal Air Force aircraft from World War II, and some more modern fighters.

Later, around 1 p.m. ET, a video of the queen's message to her people is due to be broadcast and posted on the The Royal YouTube channel.

As you would expect, all the doings are being followed closely by the BBC.

Update at 1:25 p.m. ET. Events Have Been A "Humbling Experience," The Queen Says:

The Royal Channel has now posted the queen's message. "It has touched me deeply" to see so many celebrating, she said.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit


From Trembling Teacher To Seasoned Mentor: How Tim Gunn Made It Work

Gunn, the mentor to young designers on Project Runway, has been a teacher and educator for decades. But he spent his childhood "absolutely hating, hating, hating, hating school," he says.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.