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Virginia Launches New Veteran's ID Card

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Gov. Bob McDonnell is announcing the launch of the new Virginia Veterans ID Card. The card is the brainchild of Department of Veterans Services Commissioner Paul Galanti and Del. Richard Anderson. As Galanti explains, veterans who have the documentation indicating their discharge status, with the exception of a dishonorable discharge, can pay a $10 fee at a DMV-affiliated outlet, and apply for the new card.

"There are a lot of merchants who give good deals for veterans, but if he didn't retire from the military or doesn't have a VA rating, he doesn't have an ID card that says that," says Galenti. "So this is just one way Virginia can help veterans get all the good things our citizens want to throw at them."

Unlike a driver's license, the Veterans ID card never expires. Those who apply will receive a temporary card immediately, and should receive the permanent card in the mail within a week.

Currently, 70 percent of the state's retail merchants offer veterans discounts, and several retail associations say they are aggressively recruiting the remaining merchants to follow suit.

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