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Months Of Maintenance Ahead For Woodrow Wilson Bridge

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Maintenance crews will soon inspect the foundations of the Wilson Bridge for cracks using "snooper" trucks that require lane closures.
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Maintenance crews will soon inspect the foundations of the Wilson Bridge for cracks using "snooper" trucks that require lane closures.

Starting next week, extended maintenance of the Woodrow Wilson Bridge begins. Inspection work beginning Monday around I-95/I-495 will continue through the fall.

Highway crews plans to periodically close at least one lane of traffic, but they say it won't happen during rush hour. The closures will take place Mondays through Thursdays between the hours of 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Crews will search for cracks on the Wilson bridge and the usual wear and tear damage that happens to heavily-trafficked roadways. Portions of the bridge's pedestrian walkway will also be closed during the inspections.

Last year, a Hagerstown man admitted that he approved substandard concrete products used in the construction of area roads and construction projects, including the Woodrow Wilson Bridge.

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