WAMU 88.5 : News

Advocates Push For Improved Safety Standards In Transportation Bill

Play associated audio
Some worry that improved seat belt standards might be stripped from the Senate transportation bill.
Benjamin Goodger: http://www.flickr.com/photos/bengoodger/5167426715/
Some worry that improved seat belt standards might be stripped from the Senate transportation bill.

Safety advocates say this summer's driving season is a good reminder to improve safety standards in the transportation bill being debated on Capitol Hill.

The transportation bill that came out of the Senate includes tighter safety standards for D.C.'s Metro system, but advocates fear new standards for the nation's highways might be stripped out. The Senate version improves seat belt, braking and accelerator standards. Jackie Gillan, president of Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, says now that summer is here negotiators should be even more mindful of the need for safety reforms.

"Last year between Labor Day and Memorial Day weekend, 9,500 people were killed just in that 99 day period," said Gillan. "Ninety-five-hundred people killed, just in highway crashes."

Rep. Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) says he’s concerned some of those provisions will be stripped out during the ongoing negotiations on the transportation bill.

“I get worried, you know, as we get closer and closer to a time when we may see a transportation bill on the floor that backroom deals will be made without a lot of debate and without a lot of transparency,” he says. “We’re here to tell the conferees that we’re watching and we’re here to stand up to safety."

The government's latest data for this region shows more than a thousand people died from deadly highway crashes two years ago. House and Senate negotiators are hoping to have a final bill by the end of June.

NPR

As Shakespeare Turns 450, 'Hamlet' Tour Makes The World A Stage

Shakespeare's Globe Theater aims to take the Bard's iconic play to every country in the world. They'll perform everywhere from prestigious theaters to Pacific island beaches.
NPR

Fast-Food CEOs Earn Supersize Salaries; Workers Earn Small Potatoes

A new report finds that the average compensation of fast-food CEOs has quadrupled since 2000. By comparison, worker wages have increased less than 1 percent.
NPR

Green GOP Group Caught Between 'Rock And A Hard Place'

On Earth Day 2014, it wasn't easy being an environmental organization in the Republican Party. The big donors who write checks aren't much interested in the environment.
NPR

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

Amazon, Google, Microsoft and others are competing to be the main landlords of the cloud. Their terms and prices could control who gets to build what on the Internet, and for how much.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.