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Pepco Wants Your Aging Fridge

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Pepco orkers remove the 40-year-old freezer from Corianne Atwell's house in Bethesda, Md.
Matt Bush
Pepco orkers remove the 40-year-old freezer from Corianne Atwell's house in Bethesda, Md.

Pepco wants its customers to get rid of older, energy-sucking refrigerators and freezers. The utility wants these appliances so badly, in fact, that they'll pick them up for free, and even pay customers for them.

Corriane Atwell kept a freezer in the basement of her house in Bethesda for "overflow" from her refrigerator, as she puts it. Workers took it away today, and Atwell says she's not sorry to see it go.

"It didn't freeze terribly well any longer," said Atwell. "It was a freezer, and the stuff in there wasn't much frozen anymore."

The 40-year-old freezer is a perfect example of the kind of appliance PEPCO wants its customers to recycle. Amy Friess, with the utility, says customers will receive a $50 check for every old refrigerator and freezer they recycle.

"It benefits the customer because it reduces their bill," said Friess. "And it benefits us because it reduces the load on the grid."

Pepco customers can also receive $25 for each window-unit air conditioner they wish to recycle. The most money any one customer can receive in total from the utility is $150, but to be eligible for the money, the appliances to be recycled must still be in working condition.

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