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Metro Worker Struck By Shady Grove Train

Injuries are serious and life-threatening

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First responders work to free the employee, who was pinned under a Metro train.
Scott Graham, MCFRS
First responders work to free the employee, who was pinned under a Metro train.

A Metro employee was struck Tuesday afternoon by a train at the Shady Grove rail yard. The transit agency confirms the worker was hit around 1 p.m. by a train in the workshop area of the rail yard, and they are now launching an investigation into the incident.

According to Montgomery County Fire and Rescue, a Metro employee with 25 years of experience was walking in the yard and may have stepped in front of a moving non-revenue train. He was trapped underneath that train and had to be rescued by a specialized trauma team. He is now in the hospital with serious, life-threatening injuries.

The Shady Grove rail yard is a maintenance facility for Metro's Red Line trains. Today that rail yard is still in a safety stand down so Metro managers can review safety procedures with workers and so those workers can get counseling.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Tri-State Oversight Committee have been notified.

There were no passengers on the train at the time. Red Line service was not affected.


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