The Beverages That Beguile Us, Through A Whole New Lens | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

The Beverages That Beguile Us, Through A Whole New Lens

What happens when you give an artist who is also a former bartender access to a camera mounted with a microscope? He takes pictures of drinks, of course.

That's exactly what Phoenix-based artist William "Bill" LeGoullon did in a series called Fingerprints of Drinkable Culture.

He set out to capture the relationship between science and the top five most-consumed beverages: beer, wine, cola, tea, and coffee.

But it didn't go as planned. At first, he tried to photograph the liquids while they were wet.

"It was difficult because of the way the camera and microscope work, you can't really focus on more than one little thing," he tells The Salt. "So I got frustrated and took it outside to let it dry. When it came back, it was a whole 'nother thing."

When the beverages dried on the slide, the imprints were more detailed and more beautiful than the liquids, he says. So they became the fingerprints series.

In honor of Memorial Day celebrations everywhere, enjoy these ultra close-ups from LeGoullon's collection. We guarantee you'll never look at beer, wine and cola the same way again.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, August 21

A jazz band performs at a local venue and a play explores the difficulties of surviving the American high school experience.

NPR

California Drought Has Wild Salmon Competing With Almonds For Water

Thousands of Chinook salmon are struggling to survive in the Klamath River, where waters are running dangerously low and warm. Cold reservoir water is instead going to farms in the Central Valley.
WAMU 88.5

McDonnell To Take Stand Again Today In Corruption Trial

Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell will take the stand Thursday for the second day, as defense attorneys seek to emphasize how the Republican's relationship with Jonnie Williams did not involve extending special treatment.

NPR

Islamic State Uses Online Strategies To Get Its Message Out

Experts say the videotaped killing of journalist James Foley is part of a broader propaganda strategy by Islamist militants. The group, the Islamic State, has become a master of the video medium.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.