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Lost Bike Found After 41 Years; Then, The Story Gets Weird

In 1970 a young girl lost her banana-seat bike. Lisa Brown was riding it across a rickety bridge in Cape Cod, Mass., when she and the bike tumbled into a little river. The bike sank into the muck and was gone.

Until, that is, the now adult Brown's wife, Deirdre Oringer, came across a rusted bike — banana seat and all — in the woods near where Brown's two-wheeler went into the Herring River.

That discovery happened nearly a year ago, as the Cape Cod Times reported last June, and as it "dramatically" recounted in this quite funny video.

So why mention it now?

Because it seems that Britain's Daily Mail just discovered the story and decided that the headline should be:

" 'It was like finding a long lost friend': Lesbian reunited with bike she lost FOUR DECADES ago after her wife spots it in muddy stream."

As Gawker, which is having some fun at the Mail's expense, says: "What will the lesbians do next?"

Update at 2:05 p.m. ET: Our friend Bill Chappell reminds us of the post he did last October about a man who was reunited with his racing bike after 26 years.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit


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