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D.C. Abortion Activists Stake Out Office Of Rep. Franks

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Protesters staked out Rep. Franks office Wednesday to protest his interference in D.C. abortion policy.
Matt Laslo
Protesters staked out Rep. Franks office Wednesday to protest his interference in D.C. abortion policy.

District residents protested outside the office of Republican Rep. Trent Franks Wednesday. The small group of protestors is upset with the congressman's effort to ban abortions after 20 weeks in D.C.

It might be a sign your protest isn't working when the Capitol Police are complaining that they're bored. With the House in recess, Franks isn't even in D.C. His staff locked the doors and turned off the phone lines.

Even without an audience of lawmakers or congressional staffers, more than 30 protesters lined the hall of the Rayburn House Office Building. Residents like Noah Mamber, accuse Franks of trying to play mayor by meddling in D.C.'s abortion policies — so they collected a list of other local issues for the congressman to take care of.

"There are cockroaches everywhere. I know Mayor Franks is very, very concerned about what's happening in D.C. He wants to fix things. He wants to make laws here," said Mamber. "Please Mayor Franks, come make it happen, and let's spray some roaches and have a clean Petworth. Thank you."

Theatrics aside, the group of pro-choice activists is upset Franks is trying to pass legislation banning abortions in D.C. after twenty weeks of pregnancy.

"Our view is that he shouldn't be involved in local issues at all," said Ilir Zherka, the executive director of D.C. Vote. "But if he wants to get involved in local issues, vis-a-vis this abortion issue, then he ought to hear from constituents in the District of Columbia and get involved in all these local issues.

Attempts to reach Franks and his staff weren't returned by deadline.

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