Woman Charged In Death Of Fetus Is Out Of Jail | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Woman Charged In Death Of Fetus Is Out Of Jail

Bei Bei Shuai is out of jail for the first time since March 2011.

Shuai, a Chinese immigrant who lives in Indiana, is still facing charges of murder and feticide following a failed suicide attempt in December 2010, when she was 33 weeks pregnant.

She was released today after posting a $5,000 bond.

A trial is set for Dec. 2, Emma Ketteringham, one of her lawyers, told Shots. A judge ordered Shuai to wear a GPS tracking device, which could cost $2,500 if she's required to wear until the trial begins, Kettingham said.

Shuai's case has galvanized women's groups across the country. They say that if she is convicted, it could set a precedent for further prosecutions on pregnant women for behaviors that could potentially endanger their fetuses.

Earlier this month, the Indiana Supreme Court refused to review a lower court ruling allowing the case against Shuai to go forward.

Shuai was charged after she was abandoned by the father of her baby, left a suicide note, and ingested rat poison.

She was saved and the baby, a girl, was born, but died three days later in her arms.

She is being prosecuted under laws originally intended to punish third parties who attack pregnant women and injure or kill fetuses.

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