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Henry 'Box' Brown Remembered With Marker

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Henry "Box" Brown, remembered in a print.
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Henry "Box" Brown, remembered in a print.

A historical marker making its debut in Mineral, Va. recognizes the remarkable story of Henry "Box" Brown.

Brown escaped slavery by mailing himself in a wooden box to Philadelphia and later lectured on the evils of slavery across New England and in Great Britain. Brown was born enslaved in Virginia and married his wife in Richmond. He resorted to his unique escape after his wife and children were sold in 1848 to another slave trader and sent to North Carolina. Despondent, Brown conspired with a free black man to hire a white shoemaker, who constructed a wooden box 3 feet long and 2 feet wide.

Brown was then shipped as dry goods by steamboat and train to Philadelphia.

Today, he is being honored with the formal dedication of a historical marker issued by the Virginia Department of Historic Resources.

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