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Active-Duty Military Can Enjoy National Parks For Free

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Members of the military can enjoy national parks like Shenandoah National Park free of charge starting today.
Chantal Lyons: http://www.flickr.com/photos/18161462@N00/5179546174/
Members of the military can enjoy national parks like Shenandoah National Park free of charge starting today.

Active-duty members of the military and their dependents will soon be able to enter every national park for free.

The Interior Department says annual passes will be made available to members of the military free of charge starting Saturday, which is Armed Forces Day.

The America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreation Lands Pass ordinarily costs $80. It provides access to more than 2000 national parks, wildlife refuges, and other public lands.   

Military members must show a current, valid, military identification card to obtain their pass. It can be picked up at any national park or wildlife refuge that charges an entrance fee, and at certain other sites.

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