NPR : News

Filed Under:

George W. Bush Will Return To The White House, Briefly

Later this month, former President George W. Bush will make his first public visit to the White House in more than two years, reports The Dallas Morning News. He will be joined by his wife, Laura:

"[They will be] honored by President Barack Obama with the unveiling of their official portraits that will hang at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

"The White House confirmed on Friday that the Bushes are slated to revisit their Washington home of eight years on May 31 for a rare joint appearance between the current and past presidents."

The 43rd president, who has shied away from the spotlight since leaving office, was in Washington earlier this week for a "Celebration of Freedom" in which he advocated the U.S. taking a more active role in supporting democracy movements abroad. He joked, "I actually found my freedom by leaving Washington." (Watch the CBS News video.)

Bush's previous high-profile visit to the Obama White House was in January 2010. He joined Obama and another former president, Bill Clinton, in heading up a fundraising project for earthquake-ravaged Haiti.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

As Shakespeare Turns 450, 'Hamlet' Tour Makes The World A Stage

Shakespeare's Globe Theater aims to take the Bard's iconic play to every country in the world. They'll perform everywhere from prestigious theaters to Pacific island beaches.
NPR

Fast-Food CEOs Earn Supersize Salaries; Workers Earn Small Potatoes

A new report finds that the average compensation of fast-food CEOs has quadrupled since 2000. By comparison, worker wages have increased less than 1 percent.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Weighs Which Roads To Build

Four proposals are on the table for building a new highway to the west of Dulles International Airport, but some are hoping the McAuliffe administration will reevaluate the need for a highway altogether.

NPR

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

Amazon, Google, Microsoft and others are competing to be the main landlords of the cloud. Their terms and prices could control who gets to build what on the Internet, and for how much.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.