WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Potomac Rated America's Most Endangered River

Play associated audio
American Rivers is calling for Congress to take action before wildlife like the osprey can no longer live along the Potomac.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mr_t_in_dc/5809967267/
American Rivers is calling for Congress to take action before wildlife like the osprey can no longer live along the Potomac.

Every year since 1986, an advocacy organization known as American Rivers has issued a report on the state of the nation's rivers. This year, the Potomac River earns the dubious distinction of being the most endangered river in the country as a result of threats from pollution and development.

"When a member of Congress makes his or her morning cup of coffee, they are drinking Potomac River water," says American Rivers president Bob Irvin. "So we all should be concerned about the quality of that water."

The report notes the Potomac is cleaner than it used to be, although it's still threatened by urban and agricultural pollution. Irvin says that is a problem that could get much worse if Congress rolls back critical clean water safeguards.

"We actually have situations now where many of the male fish found in the Potomac River carry eggs," says Irvin. "That's not the way nature intended it."

Another nearby waterway is on the top-10 list of endagered rivers. According to the organization, West Virginia's Coal River is threatened by mountaintop removal mining.

NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

Tunde Wey wanted to share the food of his West African childhood. So he crossed the U.S. by bus, hosting pop-up dinners along the way. But Wey, like many immigrants, found success can unravel quickly.
NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

Tunde Wey wanted to share the food of his West African childhood. So he crossed the U.S. by bus, hosting pop-up dinners along the way. But Wey, like many immigrants, found success can unravel quickly.
WAMU 88.5

New Challenges To Recycling In The United States

Falling commodity prices are putting a squeeze on American recycling companies. What this means for cities, counties and the future of recycling programs in the United States.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

Kojo chats with Freeman Hrabowski, the president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about the future of higher education - and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.