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Ward 5 Winner Could Be Swing Vote

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The Ward 5 councilmember is expected to represent a swing vote on the D.C. Council.
Mallory Noe-Payne
The Ward 5 councilmember is expected to represent a swing vote on the D.C. Council.

For years, the Thomas name has dominated Ward 5 politics, with Harry Thomas Sr. holding the seat from 1986 to 1999. Harry Thomas Jr., his son, represented the ward from 2006 until earlier this year.  The seat has been vacant since former councilmember Harry Thomas Jr. resigned in January and later pleaded guilty to embezzling more than $350,000 in public funds.

Tomorrow, voters in Ward 5 will head to the polls in a special election to pick a new council member.

With light turnout expected and a crowded field of candidates, Tuesday's Ward 5 race is seen by political observers as wide-open.  And the winner of Tuesday's contest will also assume a critical role at the D.C. Council.

"A swing vote is arriving to the council," says Chuck Thies, a local political consultant and commentator.

The polls open tomorrow morning at 7 a.m. and close at 8 p.m

You can find out more about the candidates on their campaign websites:


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