Virginia Expects More Public Safety Cuts | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Virginia Expects More Public Safety Cuts

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Virginia's Department of Criminal Justice Services Director, Garth Wheeler, says federal funds have been scaled back each year for a decade, so his agency is bracing for the next round.

Its most flexible funding source was just reduced by 28 percent. Some juvenile delinquency prevention programs were eliminated or cut by up to 44 percent, and substance abuse treatment programs for jails by 63 percent. Agency services collaborated with localities in order to continue.

Wheeler says although the Criminal Justice Services Board must now be more reserved in allocating funds, Victims Services Programs will usually get the funds they need.

"For years we all know that victims of crime were somewhat ignored," says Wheeler. "So obviously that's a priority not only for this governor, but for the Commonwealth and the federal government as well."

Wheeler says they've had to revamp how they do business, and use technology to compensate for fewer personnel. But even then, they need training funds.

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