WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Webb Proposes Bill For Congressional Approval On Military Conflicts

Play associated audio
U.S. Democratic Sen. Jim Webb gestures while talking to journalists during a press conference at the U.S. Embassy.
AP Photo/Khin Maung Win
U.S. Democratic Sen. Jim Webb gestures while talking to journalists during a press conference at the U.S. Embassy.

When the Obama administration sent battleships, planes, and hundreds of bombs into the conflict in Libya, it claimed it wasn't involved in a war; it was merely conducting humanitarian intervention.

The United Nations voted to support the no-fly zone that NATO controlled over the besieged country, but Congress never weighed in. That had lawmakers in both parties smarting. Sen. Jim Webb (D-Va.) says no president should have that power, and has introduced legislation to limit the executive branch's ability to get into military conflicts without congressional approval.

"To give one individual such discretion ridicules our Constitution," Webb says. "It belittles the role of the Congress."

Webb's legislation would require explicit congressional approval for any military conflict the U.S. enters. It also requires lawmakers to begin debating the resolution within days of the conflict's start. Besides the president, Webb is also scolding his fellow lawmakers, especially party leaders who never held a vote on whether to authorize military force in Libya.

"To accept this rationale is also to accept that the Congress no longer has any direct role in the development, and particularly in the execution of foreign policy," he says.

Webb's legislation would also require Congress to hastily approve or disapprove of any military conflict.

NPR

'Never Crossing The Botox Rubicon': Amanda Peet Explores Aging In Hollywood

NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with actress Amanda Peet about her Lenny Letter essay, "Never Crossing The Botox Rubicon," and how to navigate aging in the image-obsessed entertainment industry.
NPR

When It Came To Food, Neanderthals Weren't Exactly Picky Eaters

During the Ice Age, it seems Neanderthals tended to chow down on whatever was most readily available. Early humans, on the other hand, maintained a consistent diet regardless of environmental changes.
NPR

#MemeOfTheWeek: The Woman('s) Card

Donald Trump said Hillary Clinton was playing it this week. And then it seemed the entire Internet joined in the game.
NPR

Apple's Lousy Week Could Signal Times Of Trouble For Tech Giant

Apple got hit with a lot of bad news this week. First, the company posted its first quarterly revenue drop since 2003. And then billionaire activist investor Carl Icahn revealed that he has dumped all of his shares in Apple. NPR explores whether the company is really in trouble or if is this all just a bump in the road.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.