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Closing Arguments Heard In Trial Of Ehrlich Robocalls Consultant

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Maryland's state prosecutor says a consultant for former Republican governor Robert Ehrlich's campaign during his rematch with Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley broke the law with election day robocalls in 2010 designed to suppress black voter turnout.

Closing arguments are underway. On trial is Julius Henson, charged with influencing or attempting to influence a voter's decision whether to go to the polls through the use of fraud and publishing campaign material without an authority line, according to the Associated Press.

He has testified that the call was a counterintuitive attempt to motivate voters, and campaign manager Paul Schurick told him it didn't need an authority line, noting that Ehrlich's campaign was paying for the calls.

Last December, a jury found Schurick guilty of election fraud. The sentence included 30 days of home detention and 500 hours of community service.

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