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Alexandria Prepares For Sale Of Hunting Point On Potomac

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These two mid-rise apartment buildings, which constructed in 1950, are currently owned by the Virginia Department of Transportation.
Michael Pope
These two mid-rise apartment buildings, which constructed in 1950, are currently owned by the Virginia Department of Transportation.

Members of the Alexandria City Council are considering a resolution limiting redevelopment opportunities next to the Woodrow Wilson Bridge, one of the choicest spots of real estate in the D.C. metro area.

Most people don't think about the Virginia Department of Transportation as a landlord, but that's the case at Hunting Point on the Potomac — two mid-rise apartment buildings at the border between Alexandria and Fairfax County. Back in 1950, three mid-rise apartment buildings were constructed at Hunting Point on the Potomac. Half a century later, the Virginia Department of Transportation purchased the property to construct the Woodrow Wilson Bridge, demolishing one of the buildings in the process.

Now that VDOT is once again thinking about selling the properties, which are located on the waterfront just next to the southern tip of the District of Columbia, Alexandria Deputy City Manager Mark Jinks says coming up with the real market value may be difficult.

"The last time they put it on the market, they and the prior owner ended up in Circuit Court because they were far apart on value and could not agree upon it," says Jinks.

Councilman Rob Krupicka says Hunting Point should be preserved as affordable housing: "The city will use whatever resources and tools it can, and I emphasize the word 'can,' because there are limitations to what we can do, but to work with potential acquirers who do want to maintain it as affordable."

VDOT is currently accepting expressions of interest to determine a real market value for the waterfront property.

Later this month, council members will consider a resolution that reaffirms the current density and height restrictions — a message to developers that they will have a hard time if they want to demolish the buildings and start over.

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