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Investigation Into Adelphi Hit-And-Run Continues

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A 28-year-old man was killed in a hit-and-run Saturday night in Langley Park.
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A 28-year-old man was killed in a hit-and-run Saturday night in Langley Park.

Prince George's County police are looking for a silver SUV with front-end damage. They think that vehicle may have struck and killed Samuel Diaz, 28, just before midnight this past Saturday as he crossed the 2400 block of University Drive across from the Adelphi shopping center.

The fatal crash happened about a mile away from the intersection of University Drive and New Hampshire Avenue. This is known as the Takoma Park and Langley Park crossroads area because it borders several jurisdictions.

The area is highly congested with constant vehicle and pedestrian traffic day and night. It also has a higher than normal rate of crashes, especially those involving pedestrians. There are many businesses, restaurants and late-night bars and clubs nearby.

Ironically, the intersection is heavily patrolled by officers from the Prince George's County, Capitol Park and Montgomery County police departments, and was targeted last week as part of a traffic safety initiative.

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