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Romney's Praise Of Gingrich Leads Fox Anchor To Call Politics 'Weird, Creepy'

Fox News anchor Shepard Smith provided the sure-to-go-viral moment of the day with some commentary he made after he read aloud a statement issued by the Mitt Romney campaign after Newt Gingrich officially ended his campaign Wednesday for the GOP nomination.

Smith said:

"Mitt Romney has released a statement on the departure of Newt Gingrich from the campaign. It reads in part: 'Ann and I are proud to call Newt and Callista friends. We look forward to working with them in the months and years ahead.' That from Mitt Romney.

"Politics is weird and creepy and now I know lacks even the loosest attachment to anything like reality."

Saying pleasant things about one's political adversary who just a few short weeks earlier was ripping you apart as you returned the favor might be the accepted thing for the ultimate victor in a contest to do in politics. But Smith was clearly in no mood for it.

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