NPR : News

Romney's Praise Of Gingrich Leads Fox Anchor To Call Politics 'Weird, Creepy'

Fox News anchor Shepard Smith provided the sure-to-go-viral moment of the day with some commentary he made after he read aloud a statement issued by the Mitt Romney campaign after Newt Gingrich officially ended his campaign Wednesday for the GOP nomination.

Smith said:

"Mitt Romney has released a statement on the departure of Newt Gingrich from the campaign. It reads in part: 'Ann and I are proud to call Newt and Callista friends. We look forward to working with them in the months and years ahead.' That from Mitt Romney.

"Politics is weird and creepy and now I know lacks even the loosest attachment to anything like reality."

Saying pleasant things about one's political adversary who just a few short weeks earlier was ripping you apart as you returned the favor might be the accepted thing for the ultimate victor in a contest to do in politics. But Smith was clearly in no mood for it.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Collards And Canoodling: How Helen Gurley Brown Promoted Premarital Cooking

The legendary Cosmo editor, subject of two new biographies, knew sex sells – and food brings in ad money. She cannily combined them with features like "After Bed, What? (a light snack for an encore)."
NPR

Collards And Canoodling: How Helen Gurley Brown Promoted Premarital Cooking

The legendary Cosmo editor, subject of two new biographies, knew sex sells – and food brings in ad money. She cannily combined them with features like "After Bed, What? (a light snack for an encore)."
WAMU 88.5

The Legality Of Restoring Virginia Voting Rights

Virginia's governor is bypassing the commonwealth's Supreme Court ruling and restoring felon voting rights individually. Kojo examines Terry McAuliffe's move with a legal expert.

NPR

Sun-Powered Airplane Completes Historic Trip Around The World

"This is not only a first in the history of aviation; it's before all a first in the history of energy," Swiss pilot Bertrand Piccard says. His plane flew more than 26,700 miles without using fuel.

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