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NORAD Conducting Test Flights In D.C. Skies

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NORAD will be operating radio controlled aircraft in typically-restricted airspace near Quantico and along the Potomac.
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NORAD will be operating radio controlled aircraft in typically-restricted airspace near Quantico and along the Potomac.

Don't be surprised if you see some unusual looking aircraft in skies around the Washington region over the next couple of weeks.

Starting today, the North American Aerospace Defense Command and the Federal Aviation Administration will be conducting test flights in the Washington area, according to the Associated Press. They'll continue through next Friday.

Some of the flights will involve small radio controlled models and light sport aircraft — they're meant to help calibrate systems and equipment and to refine NORAD's ability to respond to unknown and potentially threatening aircraft.

Most of the flights will take place in daylight hours, but there will be some between midnight and 6 a.m. on May 10 and 11.

The radio controlled models will fly in restricted airspace near Quantico and along the Potomac River. Other aircraft will fly a variety of patterns at altitudes ranging from 500 feet to 18,000 feet above ground level.

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