NPR : News

Republicans Contrast Serious Romney With Slow Jammin' Obama

President Obama's urbane coolness, viewed by many as an attractive feature of his personality, was part of the joke Tuesday night when he appeared on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon, including in the "slow jammin' the news" segment.

But where Obama supporters may have seen a president willing to have some fun at his own expense, the Republican National Committee saw a chance to contrast the seriousness of Mitt Romney, the presumptive GOP presidential candidate with a president who they portrayed, for all intents and purposes, as somewhat akin to Nero fiddling while Rome burned.

The RNC video titled "A Tale of Two Leaders" contrasted bits of Romney's primary night speech with pieces of the Fallon skit. It ended with the Twitter hashtag #notfunny.

The video appeared to be the RNC's attempt to take Obama's coolness asset and turn it into a liability while at the same time trying to make Romney's serious and stiff managerial style a plus by saying serious times called for a serious man.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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