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Prince George's County To Make School Days Longer

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School officials hope longer school days will boost academic scores and lower busing costs.
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School officials hope longer school days will boost academic scores and lower busing costs.

Middle school students in Maryland's Prince George's County will be in class a little longer each day beginning in August.

Under the new plan, students will spend an additional 40 minutes in class, for a total of as much as seven hours and 20 minutes each day, longer than other students in the region, according to the Associated Press. For some students, the extra time will be used for help in science, math and reading. Others who don't need extra help in those areas will get additional enrichment classes in subjects like music or foreign language.

School officials say the new schedule will improve student achievement and will also reduce transportation costs because some middle school and high school bus routes will merge. That could save the county about $5 million a year.

Prince George's County has the third-largest school system in the Washington area.

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