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More Traffic Cameras Slated For Montgomery County

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Drivers in Montgomery County will see an additional 40 red light cameras over the next two years.
Dave Dugdale: http://www.flickr.com/photos/davedugdale/4960258290/
Drivers in Montgomery County will see an additional 40 red light cameras over the next two years.

Speed and red light cameras have helped bring in millions of dollars to Montgomery County coffers. Perhaps it is no surprise then that more cameras are on the way.

Over the next two years, 40 additional red light and 20 speed cameras will be installed throughout the county. The citations those cameras help issue brought in close to $10 million in the last fiscal year. Even so, county councilman Phil Andrews says safety, not money, has always been the main goal of the camera programs.

"Driving is the most dangerous thing most of us do everyday," says Andrews. "And it protects each of us from being hit, or decreases the chance of being hit by a red-light runner go hand in hand."

Andrews adds the bigger increase in red light cameras is due to the fact that speeding and red light running often going hand in hand. Even with the number of red light cameras doubling, the number of intersections in the county with traffic lights and cameras will be just over 10 percent.

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