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Three More Secret Service Employees Resign Over Prostitution Scandal

Update at 6:19 p.m. ET. Three Secret Service Agents Step Down:

The Secret Service confirmed that three "additional employees have chosen to resign" and a twelfth employee has been implicated.

"At this point, five employees continue to be on administrative leave and their security clearances remain suspended pending the outcome of this investigation," the agency said in a press release.

The three dismissals today brings the total number of agents forced out of the agency because of the scandal to six.

The Secret Service reiterated that it "continues to conduct a full, thorough and fair investigation."

Update at 6:31 p.m. ET. One Has Been Cleared:

In the press release the Secret Service added that one of the employees involved has been "cleared of serious misconduct, but will face appropriate administrative action."

Our Original Post Continues:

The U.S. Secret Service prostitution scandal widened today.

Depending on what report you read, the Secret Service is said to be ousting at least two more agents and the number of agents involved in the prostitution scandal has now increased to at least 11 from 10.

All news organizations reporting the story are basing it on unnamed federal officials. It's the way the story has been breaking since the beginning.

Because the numbers vary from report to report, we'll just tell you what each one is reporting, but keep in mind this story will likely change. Here's the latest reporting:

-- CNN says "Secret Service Director Mark Sullivan has ordered a 'comprehensive' investigation of everything that happened during the trip to Cartagena as part of President Barack Obama's protection detail for last week's Summit of the Americas."

-- The Washington Post reports that the Secret Service is poised to dismiss at least "two more employees."

-- NBC News puts that number at "as many as five more people" are expected to "announce departures."

-- USA Today reports the agency will dismiss three more agents and that "at least 11 agents" were implicated in the misconduct. But that it did not "involve illegal drugs."

-- The Associated Press reports that 12 secret service agents are implicated and "two agents were resigning Friday and another has been fired."

-- Fox News concurs with the AP, saying three more dismissals "would bring to six the number of people forced out after the incident last weekend in Cartagena, Columbia, where at least one agent allegedly hired a prostitute and brought her back to his hotel."

-- CBS News reports that "three more members of the Secret Service have left the agency in the wake of the Colombia prostitution scandal..."

-- Reuters reports that the agency "plans to dismiss" two more agents.

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