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Take That, Kids: Jamie Moyer Is Oldest Pitcher To Win An MLB Game

He's not as old as some bloggers (sigh!), but the Colorado Rockies' Jamie Moyer is now the holder of an impressive age-related record.

Tuesday night, at the age of 49 years, 150 days, he became the oldest pitcher to ever win a Major League Baseball game.

Playing in Denver, the Rockies beat the San Diego Padres 5-3. "Moyer worked seven innings, allowing no earned runs on six hits," The Denver Post reports.

According to the Post, the previous record holder wasn't the seemingly ageless Satchell Paige or either of the Niekro (Phil and Joe) brothers. It was "the Brooklyn Dodgers' Jack Quinn ... [who defeated] the St. Louis Cardinals in 1932 at 49 years, 70 days."

"I didn't think about this day because I thought it would be unfair to my teammates and the game," Moyer said after the game, according to the Post. "To me, it was more important that I won for this team."

As MLB.com says, he's now "one for the aged."

Moyer's first year in the big leagues was 1986. He's not, by the way, a knuckleballer.

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