NPR : News

Filed Under:

Retired Couple Bought Winning Mega Millions Ticket In Illinois

The winning ticket in Illinois from last month's record $656 Mega Millions lottery has been turned in by a retired couple from the little town of Red Bud, Ill.

"Merle Butler, 65, and his wife Patricia, 62, accepted the giant check Wednesday morning," as Chicago's WLS-TV reports.

According to the Chicago Tribune, Merle Butler "purchased the winning ticket at a local Moto Mart store using the quick pick method, a set of numbers automatically generated by a computer. He spent $3 on tickets."

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Merle Butler told reporters today that when he started to check his tickets against the winning numbers on March 30:

"The further I went, the more they matched. ... After I looked at it for a couple minutes, I turned to my wife, who was right there with me, and (I said) 'We won.' She kind of looked at me funny, and I said, 'No, we won.'

"She started giggling," he said. "And she giggled for about four hours I think."

As we've reported before, winning tickets were also sold in Maryland and Kansas. The winners in those states, though, have chosen to remain anonymous. Illinois requires its winners to be identified.

The Associated Press says the Butlers have chosen "to accept the prize as a lump-sum payment of $158 million after taxes."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

In 'Rams,' Two Icelandic Brothers Tend Troubles Of Flock And Family

Gummi and Kiddi are two sheep-herding brothers who've spent a lifetime butting heads near the top of the world. When a disease threatens their flocks, they must overcome decades of estrangement.
NPR

Beer And Snack Pairings: A Super Bowl Game Everyone Can Win

Which beer goes with guacamole? How can a brew complement spicy wings? Two craft beer experts share their favorite pairings and help us take our Super Bowl snack game to the next level.
NPR

Tourists Flock To New Hampshire For Front Row Seat To Presidential Politics

NPR's Robert Siegel reports on people who are not involved in presidential campaigns traveling to New Hampshire to observe the action surrounding the primary. There are families trying to give their kids a civics lesson, couples trying to see presidential politics up close, and groups of students who serve as interns for campaigns as part of their studies.
NPR

OK, Google, Where Did I Put My Thinking Cap?

It can be too easy for students to Google an assignment before they stop to think about it. Some researchers say we're losing our critical thinking and memory skills by relying on the search bar.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.