WAMU 88.5 : News

D.C. Brings Back Potholepalooza

Play associated audio
The District's annual Potholepalooza filled more than 5,000 potholes last year.
Martin Di Caro
The District's annual Potholepalooza filled more than 5,000 potholes last year.

They come in a variety of shapes, are several inches deep, and can cost hundreds of dollars in car repair bills. We're talking about potholes. In an effort to eliminate some of them, the District is launching its annual Potholepalooza Tuesday.

Drivers cringe at the sound of their tires making their way along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard's bumpy stretch of pavement in the Anacostia. The road looks like it used to be riddled with potholes, but has been patched up with globs of asphalt. It's not a smooth ride, but resident Anthony Johnson says it's a minor improvement.

"They are getting better," Johnson says. "They have started working on it, but they have been bad for years. That's nothing new. There are still a lot of them that's not done."

Johnson says the District's upcoming Potholepalooza is much needed.

"See that truck over there? I want to keep it for a little while," he says.

Potholes are car killers. Portia Perkins says her friend hit one pothole on Pennsylvania Avenue in southeast that wound up blowing a huge hole in her bank account.

"It messed up her muffler, and so she had to get that fixed," says Perkins. "It cost her a couple thousand dollars."

Last year, Potholepalooza filled more than 5,000 potholes. The city is asking for help in locating potholes. Individuals can email repair requests, tweet them to @DDOTDC, call information at 311, or use the District's new information SmartPhone app.

NPR

He Died At 32, But A Young Artist Lives On In LA's Underground Museum

When Noah Davis founded the museum, he wanted to bring world-class art to a neighborhood he likened to a food desert, meaning no grocery stores or museums. Davis died a year ago Monday.
NPR

The Strange, Twisted Story Behind Seattle's Blackberries

Those tangled brambles are everywhere in the city, the legacy of an eccentric named Luther Burbank whose breeding experiments with crops can still be found on many American dinner plates.
NPR

Trump Surrogate Tweets Cartoon Of Hillary Clinton In Blackface

Pastor Mark Burns mocked Hillary Clinton with a cartoon that read, in part, "I ain't no ways tired of pandering to African Americans."
NPR

A Robot That Harms: When Machines Make Life Or Death Decisions

An artist has designed a robot that purposefully defies Isaac Asimov's law that "a robot may not harm humanity" — to bring urgency to the discussion about self-driving and other smart technology.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.