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Pedestrian Struck By Freight Train In Gaithersburg

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A CSX freight train of the kind that struck a pedestrian in Gaithersburg, Md. on Friday.
Armando Trull
A CSX freight train of the kind that struck a pedestrian in Gaithersburg, Md. on Friday.

Delays abounded on the rails in the Gaithersburg, Maryland area this morning. Montgomery County Fire and Rescue say they were dispatched to the 700 block of Oakmont Avenue in Gaithersburg around 8:30 a.m. Friday morning for a pedestrian struck by a CSX freight train.

"A Hispanic male was walking along the eastbound tracks of track one when an eastbound train was approaching the station and clipped the young man's arm," explains Dan Lane with the Gaithersburg Police Department. "Per their policy, as they approach stations, they are to sound their airhorn to let pedestrians know that they are coming, and they did so. This young man was wearing earphones in the ears and was unable to hear the train."

That victim was transported to a nearby hospital. He is suffering from serious but not life-threatening injuries.

The Montgomery County police are investigating the accident, which delayed both freight and MARC service for about 30 minutes in this part of Gaithersburg. Officials say service is now back to normal.

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