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Fans Celebrate Baseball, Nats' Home Opener

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Nationals fans turned out in droves to the 2011 home opener, a spectacle that will likely be repeated Thursday.
Dave Buchhofer: http://www.flickr.com/photos/vsai/4497952034/
Nationals fans turned out in droves to the 2011 home opener, a spectacle that will likely be repeated Thursday.

The Washington Nationals host the Cincinnati Reds Thursday in the team's first home game of the season. The first pitch is set to sail over home plate at 1:05 p.m., with some of the District's most fervent fans skipping work to attend the game.

All week long, we've been asking our listeners to share stories about their love for the game. Here are just some of their stories.

Click here for the full audio.


Keith Layson and Stephanie Wieland on the importance of the ratty Nationals cap.


Shannon Dunphy Lazo attends games alone, and is proud of it.


Maria Dina DiGennaro shows off her Phillies shrine.


Lee Rosner on why his father never got into baseball.


Elizabeth Rankin of Burke, Va. remembers her father's love of the Cleveland Indians.

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Emily's story was informed by WAMU's Public Insight Network. It's a way for people to share their stories with us and for us to reach out for input on upcoming stories.

For more information, click this link.

Photos by Emily Friedman

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