NPR : News

Filed Under:

A DJ Kit You Can Take For A Spin — On Your Bike

With sensors that translate the motions of a bike — turning the handlebars, spinning the wheels, etc. — into music, the Turntable Rider "is an epic bicycle accessory which converts a bicycle into a musical instrument," according to Cogoo, the company that created the device.

That should come as welcome news to NPR fans, many of whom can be found either pulling freestyle tricks on BMX bikes or juggling beats on a DJ kit in their spare time. And they could now have a lot more time on their hands, as those two pastimes are combined into one activity.

Here's a video demonstration (with some of the best trick riding saved for last):

As you can see, the sensors can detect when the wheels are spinning backwards — and the brake levers act as sound pads, letting the rider inject extra drums or other sounds into the mix. There's even a fader lever sitting in the center of the handlebars. The sounds can be customized for each rider's style.

Cogoo, the company responsible for injecting the peanut butter of DJing into the chocolate of bicycling, is based in Japan.

For any cyclist, whether they're DJing or not, we recommend a helmet.

A tip of the hat to William Goodman of CBS for highlighting this fun video.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Pack These Pages: Three Must-Reads For Summer

Harriet Logan, owner of Loganberry Books in Shaker Heights, Ohio, recommends a graphic novel about trash, a George Eliot classic and a children's book about a bear pianist.
NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
WAMU 88.5

Why Local Nonprofits Haven't Fixed Poverty

As long as there has been poverty, there have been people trying to end it. We explore the obstacles and inefficiencies local nonprofits run into when trying to solve society's stubborn problem.

WAMU 88.5

Can We Trust Our Cars?

There were more airbag recalls this week, and VW has agreed to pay nearly fifteen billion in its emissions cheating scandal. Meanwhile, cars with driverless technology are becoming available, but whether they will make us safer is up for debate. A look at auto safety and consumer trust.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.