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A DJ Kit You Can Take For A Spin — On Your Bike

With sensors that translate the motions of a bike — turning the handlebars, spinning the wheels, etc. — into music, the Turntable Rider "is an epic bicycle accessory which converts a bicycle into a musical instrument," according to Cogoo, the company that created the device.

That should come as welcome news to NPR fans, many of whom can be found either pulling freestyle tricks on BMX bikes or juggling beats on a DJ kit in their spare time. And they could now have a lot more time on their hands, as those two pastimes are combined into one activity.

Here's a video demonstration (with some of the best trick riding saved for last):

As you can see, the sensors can detect when the wheels are spinning backwards — and the brake levers act as sound pads, letting the rider inject extra drums or other sounds into the mix. There's even a fader lever sitting in the center of the handlebars. The sounds can be customized for each rider's style.

Cogoo, the company responsible for injecting the peanut butter of DJing into the chocolate of bicycling, is based in Japan.

For any cyclist, whether they're DJing or not, we recommend a helmet.

A tip of the hat to William Goodman of CBS for highlighting this fun video.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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