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Tips Led To Tulsa Shooting Suspects' Arrests; Police Say They've Confessed

The key moment in the manhunt for suspects in a murder spree that terrorized African-Americans in Tulsa, Okla., came Saturday morning when a tip was called in to the city's Crime Stoppers hotline, the Tulsa World says.

The caller said 19-year-old Jake England was involved in Friday morning's shootings, which left three people dead and two seriously wounded, as The Associated Press writes.

Then, "over the course of [Saturday], police received dozens of tips about the shootings and a handful that implicated England, including one that said England owned a white pickup and intended to burn it," the World adds.

In "the waning hours of Saturday night," police tracked down England and his alleged accomplice, 33-year-old Alvin Watts.

Now, according to documents filed by police, the men have confessed. They're being held on pay of $9.16 million each. According to the AP, "police have said one motive for the shootings may have been England's desire to avenge his father's fatal shooting by a black man two years ago."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

'Theeb' Looks At Middle East History Through The Eyes Of A Bedouin Boy

The Oscar-nominated film is set in 1916 Saudi Arabia, a pivotal time in the region. Director Naji Abu Nowar says he wanted to explore "how strange and surreal it must have been" for the Bedouins.
NPR

Beer And Snack Pairings: A Super Bowl Game Everyone Can Win

Which beer goes with guacamole? How can a brew complement spicy wings? Two craft beer experts share their favorite pairings and help us take our Super Bowl snack game to the next level.
NPR

5 Things You Should Know Before the New Hampshire Primary

New Hampshire has a reputation for strong voter participation and independents. It's really easy to get on the ballot, and it has had a better track record of picking GOP nominees in recent years.
NPR

OK, Google, Where Did I Put My Thinking Cap?

It can be too easy for students to Google an assignment before they stop to think about it. Some researchers say we're losing our critical thinking and memory skills by relying on the search bar.

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