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Man Charged In Accidental Shooting Of 6-Year-Old

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Police are investigating who is at fault in a gun accident that led to the death of a first-grade boy.
Justin McGregor: http://www.flickr.com/photos/skippytpe/3366481352/
Police are investigating who is at fault in a gun accident that led to the death of a first-grade boy.

In Maryland, police are now charging a 20-year-old man in the fatal self-inflicted shooting of a 6-year-old boy in Clifton.

"This is a tragedy," says Corporal Larry Johnson. "We're continuing to look for answers to what led to these circumstances."

Prince George's County Police spokesperson Julie Parker says Raymond Brown, who was living the same house as the victim but was not related to him, is being charged with reckless endangerment and firearm access by a minor.

"The child, a first grader, found the gun inside a child's spiderman backpack that was left on the floor of the home," explains Parker.

Officials told NBC Washington that the gun does not belong to Brown, but it was not clear to whom it was registered or whether the book bag belong to Brown. All they would say is that Brown placed the gun there.

The State Attorney's Office is investigating.

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