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Navy F-18 Jet Crashes In Virginia Beach

The burning fuselage of an F/A-18 Hornet lies smoldering after crashing into a residential building in Virginia Beach, Va., Friday.
AP Photo
The burning fuselage of an F/A-18 Hornet lies smoldering after crashing into a residential building in Virginia Beach, Va., Friday.

A Navy F-18 jet crashed in a residential area of Virginia Beach Friday afternoon, according to a Navy spokesman.

The two-member crew safely ejected from the plane before impact, according to the Navy's official Twitter account, and reports say they have been transported to an area hospital.

According to the Associated Press, three people were hurt in the crash and subsequent fire, and four apartment buildings have sustained massive damage.

Photographs from the scene showed black smoke billowing from near some buildings and flaming wreckage.

The Hampton Roads area of Virginia has a large concentration of military bases, including Naval Station Norfolk, the largest naval base in the world. Naval Air Station Oceana is located in Virginia Beach, and was where the jet originated, according to the FAA.

Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell said the following in a statement:

"We are taking all possible steps at the state level to provide immediate resources and assistance to those impacted by the crash of an F-18 fighter jet in Virginia Beach. In the past half hour I have spoken to Virginia Beach Mayor Will Sessoms several times and informed him that all Commonwealth resources are available to him as the community responds to this breaking situation. We are monitoring events carefully as they unfold and State Police resources are now on the scene. Our fervent prayer is that no one was injured or killed in this accident."


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