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'Kony 2012' Sequel Due Tuesday

The activist group behind the "Kony 2012" movement and Web video that went viral in March says it will release "Kony 2012, Part II" on Tuesday.

As you'll likely recall, thanks to a social media campaign first aimed at young people across the U.S. and the world, Invisible Children turned its 30-minute video about Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony into a much-talked about conscious-raiser.

The group drew criticism for simplifying what's happening in Uganda and for focusing only on the killings, kidnappings and other atrocities carried out by Kony's Lord's Resistance Army and not those of other groups or government forces.

But it also made Kony into a familiar name in many American households and drew attention to the war and violence in his part of the world. The original video has been viewed more than 86 million times, and thanks to repostings elsewhere has likely been watched more than 100 million times.

Now, as The Guardian reports, Invisible Children promises "that its new film [will] give more details and context than the first."

The Guardian also writes that:

"Kony 2012's director, Jason Russell, is recovering from a mental breakdown after he was filmed running through the streets of San Diego naked and ranting about the devil. His family have said he was suffering from 'reactive psychosis' due to stress, exhaustion and dehydration following his overnight fame."

Jedidiah Jenkins, Invisible Children's director of ideology, tells Reuters that Russell is "on the road to recovery. It's going to be months, the doctors say, but he is recovering."

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