Virginia Residents Urged To Check Quake Coverage | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Virginia Residents Urged To Check Quake Coverage

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Insurance regulators in Virginia are reminding homeowners to review their policies to see if they have earthquake insurance.

The State Corporation Commission's Bureau of Insurance says damage caused by earthquakes is not included under homeowners policies unless it's purchased as an addition, according to the Associated Press. A law recently passed by the General Assembly requires companies that exclude earthquake coverage to provide a written notice that conspicuously states it must be purchased separately. That rule will apply to policies renewed or issued after January 1 of next year.

Many people may not have thought much about earthquakes before last summer's 5.8 magnitude quake, which was centered near Mineral, Va. in Louisa County, but was felt up and down the East Coast. Even seven months later, the region continues to feel the low rumble of aftershocks.

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