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Political Donor Jeffrey Thompson Resigns From Firm

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D.C. Council members who received campaign contributions from D.C. fundraiser Jeffrey Thompson may be watching his case closely this week; after his offices were raided last month, Thompson stepped down from his position with his accounting firm this week.
Mallory Noe-Payne
D.C. Council members who received campaign contributions from D.C. fundraiser Jeffrey Thompson may be watching his case closely this week; after his offices were raided last month, Thompson stepped down from his position with his accounting firm this week.

The fallout from the federal investigation into possible corruption and campaign finance irregularities involving D.C. lawmakers continues, as Jeffrey Thompson, the prominent political donor whose offices were raided by federal authorities, has stepped down from his accounting firm. That's according to a letter sent out to clients of the firm.

According to the letter, Thompson has "withdrawn from the accounting firm Thompson Cobb Bazilio and Associates." The letter says Thompson stepped down last week.

Thompson, who also owns the city's largest Medicaid contractor, has not been charged with any wrongdoing.

His offices and home were searched by federal authorities last month, and in the past few weeks, grand jury subpoenas have gone out to many council members and candidates for office asking for all campaign contribution records connected to Thompson, dating all the way back to 2003.

Campaign finance records show Thompson and his associates have donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to local campaigns over the years, including at least $100,000 to Mayor Gray's 2010 campaign, which is under federal investigation.

Thompson's network of donors has also been linked to  suspicious money orders that are now being investigated by the city's office of campaign finance. Calls to the accounting firm and Thompson's lawyer were not returned.

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