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Aftershocks Continue Months After D.C.'s 5.8 Quake

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Parts of Virginia are still feeling aftershocks nearly eight months after a 5.8-magnitude earthquake hit the D.C. region. The latest aftershock--a 3.1-magnitude trembler--struck late Sunday night. It was centered in Louisa County, 8 miles southwest of Mineral, Va. and 88 miles southwest of Washington.

The location was very close to the epicenter of last August's quake, which caused damage to buildings and landmarks in District, including the Washington Monument and National Cathedral.

No damages have been reported from last night's aftershock. It is, however, the latest in a string of dozens since August. And this may not be the last of the shaking. Seismologists say aftershocks can continue for months after a larger quake.


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