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Report: DC Water Rigged EPA Lead Testing

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A new report says that officials with DC Water deliberately misled the EPA about lead levels in area water.
Meredith Farmer: http://www.flickr.com/photos/meredithfarmer/325753101/
A new report says that officials with DC Water deliberately misled the EPA about lead levels in area water.

The District's inspector general says the city's water utility "intentionally misled" the Environmental Protection Agency about how it tested for lead in the city's drinking water between 2001 and 2003.

High levels of lead turned up in 2001, and remained elevated for about two years. In that time the city's inspector general claims the DC Water and Sewer Authority (DCWASA) tried to disguise the extent of the problem by sampling water from residences that the were unlikely to have elevated lead levels, while avoiding additional testing in areas known to have elevated lead test results.

Alan Heymann, a spokesperson for DC Water says the report, published by the Washington Examiner, is not an indictment of the agency's current management or practice.

"It all concerns a management team that's not in place anymore," says Heymann. "We're talking about testimonial and actions that was done by a group of people of who don't work for DC Water at this time."

One of those people, Glenn Gerstell, who is the former chairman of the board of directors for DCWASA, briefed the D.C. Council about the agency's testing methods. He was unavailable for comment.

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